Bride Of Frankenstein

Bride Of Frankenstein [Movie review by the Drudgeon]

Bride Of Frankenstein75 min., 1935
Directed by James Whale
My rating: *
IMDBNetflix

Kinda destroys what the first one built.

* * *

So the movie begins with Mary Shelley (Elsa Lanchester) being praised because of her story, Frankenstein, by her husband Percy (Douglas Walton) and Lord Byron (Gavin Gordon).  After some more gushing she tells them that there was actually more to the story.  We then jump to the end of Frankenstein, where Henry Frankenstein (Colin Clive) was thrown off the windmill and the mob beat him, then the windmill finished burning to the ground.  As it turn out both Henry and the Monster (Karloff) both survive, that is after a bunch of crying by Henry’s soon to be wife, Elizabeth (Valerie Hobson).  After some time a man by the name of Doctor Pretorius (Ernest Thesiger) shows up and demands to talk with Henry.  He convinces Henry, after showing him some tiny people in jars, that he should help make a mate for the Monster.  Meanwhile the Monster is causing more trouble around the town, you know killing people, breaking out of the dungeon and hanging with a blind man.  Will Henry actually go through with the creation or will he realize…wait the movie is called Bride of Frankenstein, so you know he will.

So the acting in the movie is on the same level as the original.  Over the top, but actually fits very well with the best, hands down, being Ernest Thesiger.  He is over the top like the rest but there are other times where he is just extremely subtle and it just makes him that much creepier.  Colin Clive is still great but I don’t think he was used to his full potential.

Now the effects of the movie aren’t that much better than last time, but that’s okay.  What worked before works just as good this time around.  Good enough, but not groundbreaking.  I just want to know where all of the Bride’s hair came from.

The movie is pretty good, but there are a few things that really bothered me.  First they pretty much destroyed the ending of the first movie, by making everyone survive.  The original ending was great because Henry got what was coming to him and you actually felt bad for the Monster dying.  That’s another thing that drives me nuts about this movie.  The Monster in the original was actually pretty innocent.  Yes he killed people, but for the most part he didn’t really understand.  This time around he seems to kill people just to kill them.  Right at the beginning he kills two people because…they were there.  It just took a sympathetic character and pretty much turned him extremely cruel.  Then later they try to turn him back to sympathetic.  It was just very poorly done.  The last thing I’ll bring up is the actual beginning of the movie.  Really?  Do we really need about five minutes of the movie telling us how awesome the first movie was?  That’s just very sad.  Oh, actually there is one other thing to bring up.  The movie is called Bride of Frankenstein right?  So why does it take until the last ten minutes of the movie for them to actually get to work on it.  Then we only get to see her for about four minutes.  I’m not even kidding.  The movie is named after her and we only get her for the last four minutes.  I just don’t get it.

Have You Read...?

About The Drudgeon

I don't remember my real name or where I came from. All I know is that I'm traped in an underground cave with nothing but a TV, DVD player and a notebook and pen. They keep calling me The Drudgeon, I don't even know what that means. Someone keeps dropping horror movies in and yelling at me to watch them and write about what I watch. Then I eat the DVD and case, because they tell me if I consume the horror I will understand the horror. I think there are three of them. So if you are reading this right now, HELP ME!!!!!!! OUCH!!!! Someone just poked me with a sea urchin attacked to a pool cue, what the fuck is going on?

One thought on “Bride Of Frankenstein [Movie review by the Drudgeon]

  1. Believe me–I’ve seen enough movies with Colin Clive (seven) to know that that was his full potential. He was a not-very-compelling, squeaky-voiced actor who was alternatingly stiff and over-the-top theatrical, with no stops in the middle. Watching him pay Rochester was just painful. His best performance was one of his last; he played the Billy Zane role in an early Titanic movie called HISTORY IS MADE AT NIGHT, but it didn’t require him to be anything other than the kind of melodramatic villain who would tie maidens to railroad tracks.

Leave a Reply